US Healthcare: Among Developed Nations We Spend The Most But Are Dead Last In Life Expectancy

Dismal U.S. Life Expectancy Trend Reflects Disconnect Between Dollars Spent On Healthcare And Value Produced, Forbes, November 2020

The US stands alone among all other Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations. That distinction is not good.

Decades of ever-rising healthcare expenditures haven’t led to a concomitant improvement in value, measured in terms of mortality and morbidity outcomes.

Per capita, the U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other OECD nation; more than $11,000 per person annually. But, the U.S. gets a comparatively meager return on its investment of healthcare resources.

See this next paragraph? It won’t happen. It’s not beneficial for the healthcare industry.

Moving forward, health system initiatives – such as improvements to public health, social services, changes in health insurance design, and payment reform – should be judged by whether they move the nation toward higher-value use of resources that translates into improved mortality and morbidity outcomes.

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