Dehydrated Black Beans

I like beans. I like creamy beans, the kind you get when you cook your own from scratch for hours. You just can’t get that from a can. But I don’t always have the time to cook beans for hours. So, I’m trying dehydrated beans. These are beans that are fully cooked then dried. They’re popular with backpackers because they’re lightweight and cook quickly.

Here are some black beans that I’m experimenting with:

DehydratedBlackBeans2

Close-up:

DehydratedBlackBeans3

And cooked:

DehydratedBlackBeans4

The instructions say they can be cooked in about 15 or 20 minutes. It’s true, they can. But it took about an hour for me to get this creamy consistency. And I’m impressed! It would take several hours of cooking my soaked black beans to get this creaminess. The taste is fresh, no off-flavors, very good in fact. As you can see from the container, nothing was added to this, so I’ll use it as a base to make black bean soup, adding onions, peppers, tomatoes, garlic, and spices.

For me, this is a find. I purchased them online from Amazon. Harmony House sells several types of beans. I also bought some dehydrated vegetables. that I’m looking forward to trying.

Have you ever tried dehydrated foods?

7 thoughts on “Dehydrated Black Beans

  1. Marj

    I’ve not tried dehydrated foods but am about to! This is exciting to me due to the fact we have occasional power-outages (well, most folks do) but during an ice storm when all there is to warm up is canned soups, this might be a great solution. After looking it up on Amazon, think I’ll experiment with the dehydrated veggies, beans, etc. and find something good and easy to whip up for emergencies. I’d think it would taste fresher than canned. Well, we’ll see. Thanks.

    Reply
    1. Bix Post author

      It is fun. I love experimenting. I’ll say this, dehydrated tastes better than canned. You do have to cook it a tad more, but I’d still call it a convenience food. No worries about BPA in can linings too. And with dehydrated, we control the quality of the water.

      Reply
    2. Bix Post author

      I totally sympathize about ice storms and power-outages. There was one ice storm (I know, shut me up if you’ve heard this before) where we had no electricity for 5 days. The overnight temperatures were in the teens, no heat. I wore my winter coat 24 hours a day. That was just a taste! of what it was like in this country in pioneer days.

      Reply
      1. Marj

        Yes, I’ve been through similar ice storms, in fact one last winter for 3 days. Brrr! And referring to pioneer days, how about (present-day doom and gloom) a failure of large parts of the national power grid–in winter! Sorry, but it has been talked about.

        Reply
        1. Bix Post author

          Three days counts. It’s definitely a long time to go without electricity when we are so used to it. Talking about the power grid … sometimes our electricity goes out on a clear beautiful day. Not for long, but it does give you a sense of its fragility.

  2. Melinda

    I never heard of dehydrated. par-cooked beans, but they sound great! About 5 years ago I bought a dehydrator (not expensive) and so have dried lots of veggies myself. And you’re right, it’s wonderful in winter to have a supply of foods to rehydrate. And it’s a LOT easier than canning, though home-canned tomato sauce is fabulous in winter. There’s a good paperback book by Phyllis Hobson called “Making and Using Dried Foods.” What’s good about it is that it doesn’t just tell you how to dry them, but also how to use them in recipes!

    Reply
  3. Bix Post author

    I just made split pea soup with their dehydrated split peas. I’m so pleased! All the regular split peas I’ve purchased in the last year have had hard-to-cook defect. They were like pebbles in water even after 4 hours.

    I just think many people don’t cook from scratch anymore and the peas sit on the shelf in a store. There really is no way (that I know) of telling if peas will cook or not until after you cook them. So, just that these peas cooked was a joy.

    Reply

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